Philanthropy and the Development of Modern India

In the Name of Nation

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ISBN:

9780192862969

Publication date:

17/11/2021

Hardback

240 pages

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780192862969

Publication date:

17/11/2021

Hardback

240 pages

Arun Kumar

Philanthropy and the Development of Modern India plots the careers of the national-modern in four main sites of development: civil society, community, science and technology, and selfhood.

Rights:  World Rights

Arun Kumar

Description

Drawing on the history of the philanthropy of India's economic elites, Arun Kumar discusses how their ideas and understanding of development have shifted and changed over time. Going beyond the more familiar criticisms of development's entanglements with colonialism, Kumar interrogates the changes in development imaginaries in terms of modernity's entanglements with the national question, including anti-colonial nationalism and post-colonial nation-building during the twentieth century. Development, he suggests, can be usefully read and critiqued as national-modern. Philanthropy and the Development of Modern India plots the careers of the national-modern in four main sites of development: civil society, community, science and technology, and selfhood. In an unusual move reading socio-economic nationalist reform from the first half of the twentieth century alongside post-colonial development from the second half, Kumar uncovers the lineages of contemporary development ideas such as self-care, self-reliance, merit, etc. In all this, elites were driven by a 'pedagogic reflex': to teach different sections of Indian society of how to be modern and developed. Contrary to development studies' characterization of elites as anti-development or captors of scarce resources, Kumar shows how elites longed for development for others. Development provided the moral justification, in their calculations, for protecting their commercial interests as they navigated the turbulent Indian twentieth century.

About the author:

Arun Kumar is a Lecturer at the University of York, UK. He researches the role of businesses and philanthropy in India's development. His archival research has been funded by the Economic History Society, UK and the Rockefeller Archives Center, USA. In an earlier life, he was trained as an architect and a development manager, and worked for nearly eight years consulting with advocacy groups, NGOs, think tanks, donors, and independent research organizations in India.

Arun Kumar

Table of contents

1. Development, modernity, nation: An Introduction
2. Community: In Nation's Name
3. Self: Meritorious Few, Masses, and Citizens
4. Making Science Indian
5. Development: Elites' Pedagogic Reflex
Coda: The Calculus of Development
Appendix: Elites' Historiographic Anxieties - A Methodological Caution

Arun Kumar

Arun Kumar

Arun Kumar

Description

Drawing on the history of the philanthropy of India's economic elites, Arun Kumar discusses how their ideas and understanding of development have shifted and changed over time. Going beyond the more familiar criticisms of development's entanglements with colonialism, Kumar interrogates the changes in development imaginaries in terms of modernity's entanglements with the national question, including anti-colonial nationalism and post-colonial nation-building during the twentieth century. Development, he suggests, can be usefully read and critiqued as national-modern. Philanthropy and the Development of Modern India plots the careers of the national-modern in four main sites of development: civil society, community, science and technology, and selfhood. In an unusual move reading socio-economic nationalist reform from the first half of the twentieth century alongside post-colonial development from the second half, Kumar uncovers the lineages of contemporary development ideas such as self-care, self-reliance, merit, etc. In all this, elites were driven by a 'pedagogic reflex': to teach different sections of Indian society of how to be modern and developed. Contrary to development studies' characterization of elites as anti-development or captors of scarce resources, Kumar shows how elites longed for development for others. Development provided the moral justification, in their calculations, for protecting their commercial interests as they navigated the turbulent Indian twentieth century.

About the author:

Arun Kumar is a Lecturer at the University of York, UK. He researches the role of businesses and philanthropy in India's development. His archival research has been funded by the Economic History Society, UK and the Rockefeller Archives Center, USA. In an earlier life, he was trained as an architect and a development manager, and worked for nearly eight years consulting with advocacy groups, NGOs, think tanks, donors, and independent research organizations in India.

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Table of contents

1. Development, modernity, nation: An Introduction
2. Community: In Nation's Name
3. Self: Meritorious Few, Masses, and Citizens
4. Making Science Indian
5. Development: Elites' Pedagogic Reflex
Coda: The Calculus of Development
Appendix: Elites' Historiographic Anxieties - A Methodological Caution

Read More