Peace Love Yoga

The Politics of Global Spirituality

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ISBN:

9780197621134

Publication date:

24/11/2021

Hardback

222 pages

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780197621134

Publication date:

24/11/2021

Hardback

222 pages

Andrea R. Jain

Engaging with the growing popular and academic interest in the "spiritual but not religious," Andrea R. Jain explores the connections between the practices of global spirituality and aspects of neoliberal capitalism in Peace Love Yoga. 

Rights:  World Rights

Andrea R. Jain

Description

Engaging with the growing popular and academic interest in the "spiritual but not religious," Andrea R. Jain explores the connections between the practices of global spirituality and aspects of neoliberal capitalism in Peace Love Yoga. "Personal growth," "self-care," and "transformation" are all tropes in the narrative of the spiritual identity Jain is concerned with. This "spirituality" is usually depicted as firmly countercultural: the term "alternative" (alternative health, alternative medicine, alternative spiritualities) is omnipresent. To the contrary, Jain argues, spiritual commodities, entrepreneurs, and consumers are quite mainstream and sometimes even conservative and nationalistic. Ranging from the transnational to the economic to the activist, Jain refuses the single narrative focus of most works on the SBNR; human phenomena that can be analyzed through a single lens or narrative are few and far between, and existing research in this area too often yields a suspiciously tidy story.

The heart of the book includes sophisticated analyses of: two politically divergent but equally entrepreneurial and global-capitalist yoga gurus; "athleisure apparel" corporations, such as lululemon, that successfully market consumer goods as a purchased commitment to social justice; and therapeutically-focused applications of spirituality that concentrate on healing the broken person rather than undermining the system that broke that person in the first place.

Many spiritual commodities, corporations, and entrepreneurs, Jain suggests, do actually acknowledge the problems of neoliberal capitalism and in fact subvert them; but they subvert them through mere gestures. From provocative taglines printed across t-shirts or packaging to calls for "conscious capitalism," commodification serves as a strategy through which subversion itself is colonized. 

About the author:

Andrea R. Jain, Ph.D. is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Indiana University, Indianapolis (IUPUI), editor of the Journal of the American Academy of Religion, and author of Selling Yoga: From Counterculture to Pop Culture. Her areas of research include religion under neoliberal capitalism; global yoga; South Asian religions; sexuality, embodiment, and religion; and theories of religion 

Andrea R. Jain

Table of contents

No Bad Vibes: A Preface

1. Breathe Practice Repeat: Theorizing Neoliberal Spirituality, or, Religion Under neoliberal Capitalism
2. Good Karma: Debating Authenticity in the Study of Neoliberal Spirituality
3. Namaste All Day: Appropriating and Commodifying the Ancient, Exotic, and Evocative
4. Self Love Club: Neoliberal Feminism and the Call to Heal the Self, Not the System
5. Made in Bharat: Yoga as Political Ritual
An Inside Job: Concluding Remarks 

Andrea R. Jain

Andrea R. Jain

Andrea R. Jain

Description

Engaging with the growing popular and academic interest in the "spiritual but not religious," Andrea R. Jain explores the connections between the practices of global spirituality and aspects of neoliberal capitalism in Peace Love Yoga. "Personal growth," "self-care," and "transformation" are all tropes in the narrative of the spiritual identity Jain is concerned with. This "spirituality" is usually depicted as firmly countercultural: the term "alternative" (alternative health, alternative medicine, alternative spiritualities) is omnipresent. To the contrary, Jain argues, spiritual commodities, entrepreneurs, and consumers are quite mainstream and sometimes even conservative and nationalistic. Ranging from the transnational to the economic to the activist, Jain refuses the single narrative focus of most works on the SBNR; human phenomena that can be analyzed through a single lens or narrative are few and far between, and existing research in this area too often yields a suspiciously tidy story.

The heart of the book includes sophisticated analyses of: two politically divergent but equally entrepreneurial and global-capitalist yoga gurus; "athleisure apparel" corporations, such as lululemon, that successfully market consumer goods as a purchased commitment to social justice; and therapeutically-focused applications of spirituality that concentrate on healing the broken person rather than undermining the system that broke that person in the first place.

Many spiritual commodities, corporations, and entrepreneurs, Jain suggests, do actually acknowledge the problems of neoliberal capitalism and in fact subvert them; but they subvert them through mere gestures. From provocative taglines printed across t-shirts or packaging to calls for "conscious capitalism," commodification serves as a strategy through which subversion itself is colonized. 

About the author:

Andrea R. Jain, Ph.D. is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Indiana University, Indianapolis (IUPUI), editor of the Journal of the American Academy of Religion, and author of Selling Yoga: From Counterculture to Pop Culture. Her areas of research include religion under neoliberal capitalism; global yoga; South Asian religions; sexuality, embodiment, and religion; and theories of religion 

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Table of contents

No Bad Vibes: A Preface

1. Breathe Practice Repeat: Theorizing Neoliberal Spirituality, or, Religion Under neoliberal Capitalism
2. Good Karma: Debating Authenticity in the Study of Neoliberal Spirituality
3. Namaste All Day: Appropriating and Commodifying the Ancient, Exotic, and Evocative
4. Self Love Club: Neoliberal Feminism and the Call to Heal the Self, Not the System
5. Made in Bharat: Yoga as Political Ritual
An Inside Job: Concluding Remarks 

Read More