Patterns of Potential Human Progress

Improving Global Health

Price: 995.00 INR

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ISBN:

9780198069416

Publication date:

04/05/2011

Paperback

352 pages

Price: 995.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780198069416

Publication date:

04/05/2011

Paperback

352 pages

Barry B. Hughes, Series Editor, Jose R. Solorzano, Dale S. Rothman, Celicia Mosca Peterson & Randall Kuhn

Suitable for: Scholars and students of economics, sociology, development studies, and public health; administrators and policymakers, and concerned government departments and ministries, and related institutions; healthcare and medical professionals, NGOs, and journalists.

Rights:  SOUTH ASIA RIGHTS (RESTRICTED)

Barry B. Hughes, Series Editor, Jose R. Solorzano, Dale S. Rothman, Celicia Mosca Peterson & Randall Kuhn

Description

Improving Global Health is the third in a series of volumes—Patterns of Potential Human Progress—inspired by the UN Human Development Reports, the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and other initiatives to improve the global human condition. Using a large-scale computer programme called International Futures (IFs), developed over three decades, and based at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, the book presents the most extensive sets of forecasts on global health—providing and exploring a massive issue database and a wide range of scenarios. This volume builds on the work done by the World Health Organization in its Global Burden of Disease and Comparative Risk Assessment Projects, allowing forecasting of age-, sex-, country-, and cause-specific mortality. Along with exploring possible futures for the health of the world’s population, it also analyzes how varying health outcomes affect broader dimensions of human growth and development. It thus addresses central, policy-relevant questions facing most countries today. The forecasts are long-term, looking 50 years into the future, thereby anticipating the need of the global community to think well beyond the MDGs.    

Barry B. Hughes, Series Editor, Jose R. Solorzano, Dale S. Rothman, Celicia Mosca Peterson & Randall Kuhn

Barry B. Hughes, Series Editor, Jose R. Solorzano, Dale S. Rothman, Celicia Mosca Peterson & Randall Kuhn

Barry B. Hughes, Series Editor, Jose R. Solorzano, Dale S. Rothman, Celicia Mosca Peterson & Randall Kuhn

Barry B. Hughes, Series Editor, Jose R. Solorzano, Dale S. Rothman, Celicia Mosca Peterson & Randall Kuhn

Description

Improving Global Health is the third in a series of volumes—Patterns of Potential Human Progress—inspired by the UN Human Development Reports, the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and other initiatives to improve the global human condition. Using a large-scale computer programme called International Futures (IFs), developed over three decades, and based at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, the book presents the most extensive sets of forecasts on global health—providing and exploring a massive issue database and a wide range of scenarios. This volume builds on the work done by the World Health Organization in its Global Burden of Disease and Comparative Risk Assessment Projects, allowing forecasting of age-, sex-, country-, and cause-specific mortality. Along with exploring possible futures for the health of the world’s population, it also analyzes how varying health outcomes affect broader dimensions of human growth and development. It thus addresses central, policy-relevant questions facing most countries today. The forecasts are long-term, looking 50 years into the future, thereby anticipating the need of the global community to think well beyond the MDGs.    

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