James Joyce: A Very Short Introduction

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ISBN:

9780192894472

Publication date:

12/05/2022

Paperback

152 pages

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780192894472

Publication date:

12/05/2022

Paperback

152 pages

Colin MacCabe

This Very Short Introduction explores the work of this most influential yet complex writer, and analyses how Joyce's difficulty grew out of his situation as an Irish writer unwilling to accept the traditions of his imperialist oppressor, and contemptuous of the cultural banality of the Gaelic revival.

Rights:  World Rights

Colin MacCabe

Description

James Joyce is one of the greatest writers in English. His first book, A Portrait of the Artist as A Young Man laid down the template for the Coming of Age novel, while his collection of short stories, Dubliners, is of perennial interest. His great modern epic, Ulysses, took the city of Dublin for its setting and all human life for its subject, and its publication in 1922 marked the beginning of the modern novel. Joyce's final work, Finnegans Wake is an endless experiment in narrative and language. But if Joyce is a great writer he is also the most difficult writer in English. Finnegans Wake is written in a freshly invented language, and Ulysses exhausts all the forms and styles of English. Even the apparently simple Dubliners has plots of endless complexity, while the structure of A Portrait of the Artist as A Young Man is exceptionally intricate.

This Very Short Introduction explores the work of this most influential yet complex writer, and analyses how Joyce's difficulty grew out of his situation as an Irish writer unwilling to accept the traditions of his imperialist oppressor, and contemptuous of the cultural banality of the Gaelic revival. Joyce wanted to investigate and celebrate his own life, but this meant investigating and celebrating the drunks of Dublin's pubs and the prostitutes of Dublin's brothels. No subject was alien to him and he developed the naturalist project of recording all aspects of life with the symbolist project of finding significant correspondences in the most unlikely material. Throughout, Colin MacCabe interweaves Joyce's life and history with his books, and draws out their themes and connections.

About the author:

Colin MacCabe is Distinguished Professor of English and Film, University of Pittsburgh. After becoming the youngest professor of English in the UK with a Chair at Strathclyde University in the 1980s, he split his energies between literary criticism at the University of Pittsburgh and producing films at the BFI (1985-1998); Minerva Pictures (1998-2005); and The Derek Jarman Lab (2012-present). Throughout his career he has studied and taught on James Joyce while writing on many other topics in film and literature in subsequent decades. MacCabe's other books include Keywords for Today (2019, co-edited with Holly Yanacek), and Perpetual Carnival:Essays on Film and Literature (2017).

Colin MacCabe

Table of contents

1. Story and sound
2. Dubliners
3. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
4. Ulysses
5. Finnegans Wake
6. Conclusion: Elite past or democratic future?
Further Reading
Index

Colin MacCabe

Colin MacCabe

Colin MacCabe

Description

James Joyce is one of the greatest writers in English. His first book, A Portrait of the Artist as A Young Man laid down the template for the Coming of Age novel, while his collection of short stories, Dubliners, is of perennial interest. His great modern epic, Ulysses, took the city of Dublin for its setting and all human life for its subject, and its publication in 1922 marked the beginning of the modern novel. Joyce's final work, Finnegans Wake is an endless experiment in narrative and language. But if Joyce is a great writer he is also the most difficult writer in English. Finnegans Wake is written in a freshly invented language, and Ulysses exhausts all the forms and styles of English. Even the apparently simple Dubliners has plots of endless complexity, while the structure of A Portrait of the Artist as A Young Man is exceptionally intricate.

This Very Short Introduction explores the work of this most influential yet complex writer, and analyses how Joyce's difficulty grew out of his situation as an Irish writer unwilling to accept the traditions of his imperialist oppressor, and contemptuous of the cultural banality of the Gaelic revival. Joyce wanted to investigate and celebrate his own life, but this meant investigating and celebrating the drunks of Dublin's pubs and the prostitutes of Dublin's brothels. No subject was alien to him and he developed the naturalist project of recording all aspects of life with the symbolist project of finding significant correspondences in the most unlikely material. Throughout, Colin MacCabe interweaves Joyce's life and history with his books, and draws out their themes and connections.

About the author:

Colin MacCabe is Distinguished Professor of English and Film, University of Pittsburgh. After becoming the youngest professor of English in the UK with a Chair at Strathclyde University in the 1980s, he split his energies between literary criticism at the University of Pittsburgh and producing films at the BFI (1985-1998); Minerva Pictures (1998-2005); and The Derek Jarman Lab (2012-present). Throughout his career he has studied and taught on James Joyce while writing on many other topics in film and literature in subsequent decades. MacCabe's other books include Keywords for Today (2019, co-edited with Holly Yanacek), and Perpetual Carnival:Essays on Film and Literature (2017).

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Table of contents

1. Story and sound
2. Dubliners
3. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
4. Ulysses
5. Finnegans Wake
6. Conclusion: Elite past or democratic future?
Further Reading
Index

Read More