Curing Madness ?

A Social and Cultural History of Insanity in Colonial North India, 1800-1950s

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ISBN:

9780190128012

Publication date:

23/12/2021

Hardback

316 pages

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780190128012

Publication date:

23/12/2021

Hardback

316 pages

Shilpi Rajpal

The book focusses on the institutional and non-institutional histories of madness in colonial north India. It proves that 'madness' and its 'cure' are shifting categories which assumed new meanings and significance as knowledge travelled across cultural, medical, national, and regional boundaries.

Rights:  World Rights

Shilpi Rajpal

Description

Curing Madness? focusses on the institutional and non-institutional histories of madness in colonial north India. It proves that 'madness' and its 'cure' are shifting categories which assumed new meanings and significance as knowledge travelled across cultural, medical, national, and regional boundaries.
The book examines governmental policies, legal processes, diagnosis and treatment, and individual case histories by looking closely at asylums in Agra, Benaras, Bareilly, Lucknow, Delhi, and Lahore. Rajpal highlights that only a few mentally ill ended up in asylums; most people suffering from insanity were cared for by their families and local vaidyas, ojhas, and pundits. These practitioners of traditional medicine had to reinvent themselves to retain their relevance as Western medical knowledge was widely disseminated in colonial India. Evidence of this is found in the Hindi medical advice literature of the era. Taking these into account Shilpi Rajpal moves beyond asylum-centric histories to examine extensive archival materials gathered from various repositories.

About the Author:

Shilpi Rajpal is Assistant Professor, School of Liberal Arts, Auro University, Surat, Gujarat

Shilpi Rajpal

Table of contents

List of Figures
Acknowledgements
Introduction
1 Lunacy and the Colonial State
2 Managing Madness: Architecture, Medicine, and Personnel
3 Everyday Histories: Life inside the Asylum Walls
4 Case Notes and Histories: Insanity, Institutions, and Individuals
5 Indigenous Traditions, Modernity, and Madness
Epilogue
Appendices
B ibliography
Index

Shilpi Rajpal

Shilpi Rajpal

Shilpi Rajpal

Description

Curing Madness? focusses on the institutional and non-institutional histories of madness in colonial north India. It proves that 'madness' and its 'cure' are shifting categories which assumed new meanings and significance as knowledge travelled across cultural, medical, national, and regional boundaries.
The book examines governmental policies, legal processes, diagnosis and treatment, and individual case histories by looking closely at asylums in Agra, Benaras, Bareilly, Lucknow, Delhi, and Lahore. Rajpal highlights that only a few mentally ill ended up in asylums; most people suffering from insanity were cared for by their families and local vaidyas, ojhas, and pundits. These practitioners of traditional medicine had to reinvent themselves to retain their relevance as Western medical knowledge was widely disseminated in colonial India. Evidence of this is found in the Hindi medical advice literature of the era. Taking these into account Shilpi Rajpal moves beyond asylum-centric histories to examine extensive archival materials gathered from various repositories.

About the Author:

Shilpi Rajpal is Assistant Professor, School of Liberal Arts, Auro University, Surat, Gujarat

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Table of contents

List of Figures
Acknowledgements
Introduction
1 Lunacy and the Colonial State
2 Managing Madness: Architecture, Medicine, and Personnel
3 Everyday Histories: Life inside the Asylum Walls
4 Case Notes and Histories: Insanity, Institutions, and Individuals
5 Indigenous Traditions, Modernity, and Madness
Epilogue
Appendices
B ibliography
Index

Read More