Cultivating Democracy

Politics and Citizenship in Agrarian India

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ISBN:

9780197639931

Publication date:

15/12/2021

Paperback

256 pages

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780197639931

Publication date:

15/12/2021

Paperback

256 pages

Mukulika Banerjee

Cultivating Democracy provides a compelling ethnographic analysis of the relationship between formal political institutions and everyday citizenship in rural India. Banerjee draws on deep engagement with the people and social life in two West Bengal villages from 1998-2013, during election campaigns and in the times between, to show how the micro-politics of their day-to-day life builds active engagement with the macro-politics of state and nation

Rights:  World Rights

Mukulika Banerjee

Description

An ethnographic study of Indian democracy that shows how agrarian life creates values of citizenship and active engagement that are essential for the cultivation of democracy.

Cultivating Democracy provides a compelling ethnographic analysis of the relationship between formal political institutions and everyday citizenship in rural India. Banerjee draws on deep engagement with the people and social life in two West Bengal villages from 1998-2013, during election campaigns and in the times between, to show how the micro-politics of their day-to-day life builds active engagement with the macro-politics of state and nation. Her sensitive analysis focuses on several "events" in the life of the villages shows how India's agrarian rural society helps create practices and conceptual space for these citizens to be effective participants in India's great democratic exercises. Specifically, she shows how the villagers' creative practices around their kinship, farming and religion, while navigating encounters with local communist cadres, constitute a vital and continuing cultivation of those republican virtues of cooperation, civility, solidarity and vigilance which the visionary Ambedkar considered essential for the success of Indian democracy. At a time when so much of that constitutional vision is under threat, this book provides a crucial scholarly rebuttal to all, on Right or Left, who dismiss rural citizens' political capacities and democratic values. This book will appeal to anyone interested in India's political culture and future, its rural society, or the continuing relevance of political anthropology.

About the author:

Mukulika Banerjee is Associate Professor in Social Anthropology at the London School of Economics. Her books include Why India Votes?, The Pathan UnarmedThe Sari, and the edited volume Muslim Portraits.

Mukulika Banerjee

Table of contents

Preface
I. The Event and Democracy
II. Context: The village in a democracy
III. Scandal: Cultivating competition
IV. Harvest: Cultivating solidarity
V. Qurbani: Cultivating faith
VI. Election: Cultivating citizenship
VII. Cultivating democracy
Acknowledgements

Mukulika Banerjee

Mukulika Banerjee

Mukulika Banerjee

Description

An ethnographic study of Indian democracy that shows how agrarian life creates values of citizenship and active engagement that are essential for the cultivation of democracy.

Cultivating Democracy provides a compelling ethnographic analysis of the relationship between formal political institutions and everyday citizenship in rural India. Banerjee draws on deep engagement with the people and social life in two West Bengal villages from 1998-2013, during election campaigns and in the times between, to show how the micro-politics of their day-to-day life builds active engagement with the macro-politics of state and nation. Her sensitive analysis focuses on several "events" in the life of the villages shows how India's agrarian rural society helps create practices and conceptual space for these citizens to be effective participants in India's great democratic exercises. Specifically, she shows how the villagers' creative practices around their kinship, farming and religion, while navigating encounters with local communist cadres, constitute a vital and continuing cultivation of those republican virtues of cooperation, civility, solidarity and vigilance which the visionary Ambedkar considered essential for the success of Indian democracy. At a time when so much of that constitutional vision is under threat, this book provides a crucial scholarly rebuttal to all, on Right or Left, who dismiss rural citizens' political capacities and democratic values. This book will appeal to anyone interested in India's political culture and future, its rural society, or the continuing relevance of political anthropology.

About the author:

Mukulika Banerjee is Associate Professor in Social Anthropology at the London School of Economics. Her books include Why India Votes?, The Pathan UnarmedThe Sari, and the edited volume Muslim Portraits.

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Table of contents

Preface
I. The Event and Democracy
II. Context: The village in a democracy
III. Scandal: Cultivating competition
IV. Harvest: Cultivating solidarity
V. Qurbani: Cultivating faith
VI. Election: Cultivating citizenship
VII. Cultivating democracy
Acknowledgements

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